Peony Tulipiere

Only a hand full of garden plants go back in time as far as peonies. They’re ancient flowers with an extremely rich history. They’ve been used and cultivated for thousands of years in China and they’ve also played a part in Greek mythology. Peonies received their name from a Greek pupil of Asclepius, who is the Greek god of medicine and healing. Rumor has it that Zeus saved the pupil, Paeon, from Asclepius by turning him into the peony flower. However, all mythology aside, peonies have long been acknowledged for its medicinal qualities. This beautiful plant is used to alleviate a variety of ailments because their roots, flowers and seeds which are used to make medicine. The peony is still used to treat modern day illnesses, but one ancient belief stuck with me, the flower’s ability to alleviate toothaches. While doing some research, to my surprise, I’ve discovered that Chinese peony mouthwash is for sale on the internet. They peony root posses anti-inflammatory qualities and is one of the most important herbs in Oriental medicine. Learning about the peony and all of its rich history has influenced me to make a tulipiere. Formally I wanted my tulipiere to mimic the shape of a molar, hence the root like protrusions stemming from the body or “tooth”. The peony is more than just a beautiful flower and deserves a dignified “vase” to embrace it.

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